• 22Jun

    A woman’s body goes through a cycle every month during the pre-menopausal years in which it prepares for pregnancy. If pregnancy does not occur, the lining of the uterus is shed, resulting in a period. A woman’s monthly menstrual cycle can cause many physical and emotional symptoms. This can include mood swings, fatigue, stomach cramps and cold and flu-like symptoms. For some women, the symptoms are mild while in others they can disrupt everyday life. If cold and flu symptoms occur during menstruation, there are various remedies that can be tried.

    Short Red Hair Woman Blowing Her Nose

    If you feel sick before a period, you are just one of the many women who suffer from various symptoms before getting their periods. It is more common to hear from women who get sick with nausea, vomiting, as well as diarrhea or constipation during their periods.

    Symptoms from menstruation can begin days before a period occurs and last throughout the period. To help manage symptoms, it may be helpful to keep track of them, along with what makes them better and what makes them worse.

    stock photo, girl, pillow, sick, flu

    Some women do ask: Why do i get sick or feel malaise before my period? Some get throat pain before periods, while others have flu-like symptoms with a slight temperature. Here’s some information about the strange symptom of falling sick-before-period faced by some women.

    Hormonal Changes: Estrogen and Progesterone are the two hormones that are at their peak when a woman’s body is preparing for a possible pregnancy (just before a period). This increased level of the two hormones has been deduced to be the major cause of the flu-like symptoms, especially the throbbing headaches that you experience before your period. Also, hormonal birth control pills that you might be consuming are another cause for these headaches before your period.

    In some cases, taking time during menstruation to exercise and practice relaxation techniques can help to calm symptoms down. Other patients may need prescription or over-the-counter medications to control the pain.

    The menstrual cycle can also cause widespread weakness, fatigue and trouble sleeping, claims the National Woman’s Health Information Center. This may or may not be accompanied by a loss in appetite and irritability.

    If these symptoms occur, it is important to get about eight hours of sleep each night and to try to eat a healthy diet with exercise. It may also be helpful to speak with a health care provider about taking folic acid, calcium, vitamin D, magnesium, vitamin B-6 and/or vitamin E supplements.

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  • 29Mar

    Premenstrual Syndrome or PMS symptoms are not a normal part of life.  Symptoms are generally warning signs from our bodies that something is out of balance. More and more women are struggling with PMS because two major factors: diet and stress levels have changed in our modern lives.  Stress levels are at an all-time high for women and never before have there been so many pre-packaged, GMO and low-nutrient foods available.  All these, along with stress wreck havoc to a woman’s body.

    Stress can be one of the more debilitating symptoms of PMS. It doesn’t seem to care whether or not you’ve suffered from it in the past; it can just strike you down at random and make an ordinary day suddenly overwhelming.

    Women who say they feel stressed early in their menstrual cycle are more likely to report the cramping, bloating and mood swings of PMS — premenstrual syndrome — later in the month, a new study shows.

    Researchers from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, along with researchers from other institutions, quizzed 259 women of childbearing age about their stress levels. The women were asked how often they felt unable to control their lives, and how often they felt nervous, for example. Study participants who reported a lot of stress early in the menstrual cycle were subsequently more likely than relaxed women to report moderate or severe discomfort before and during menstruation. Furthermore, all of the women in the study were followed for more than one cycle; among women who reported stress in one month and not in the next month, the more stressful month was, on average, followed by worse symptoms of PMS. 

    PMS

    It is not totally clear why stress might affect a woman’s physical comfort and mood even weeks later, before and during her period. But stress is a hormonal process, and so, of course, is much of the work of the reproductive system. Writing in the Journal of Women’s Health, the researchers say that stress may have an impact on PMS through several channels: perhaps by altering levels of ovarian hormones, or perhaps because the stress hormone cortisol has an impact on PMS symptoms. “Stress-reduction programs,” the researchers write, “may be an effective, nonpharmaceutical treatment” for both physical and psychological symptoms of PMS.

    For some women, stress may play a role in causing irregular or missed periods. As stress levels rise, there’s a chance that your menstrual period will temporarily stop, a condition known as secondary amenorrhea.

    When I took on a new job with a much higher position and salary years ago, the job came with increased stress. I had irregular meals, did not have the time to exercise and worked very long hours. Less than a year into the new job, I was diagnosed with Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)
    and infertility. It took me 2.5 years before I conceived my eldest daughter, via IUI.

    Stress early in the cycle is a risk factor for PMS and combating stress  with yoga, exercise, biofeedback, fun time, positive thinking or meditation may help prevent PMS symptoms or make them much more manageable. The symptoms may not go away completely, but stress-reduction techniques could make symptoms more manageable.

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  • 11Nov

    I  normally feel bloated, fat and have a gassy abdomen about a week lining up to my period.  This month is especially bad. I looked like a 4 months pregnant woman from my side view.  And what shocked me was that the needle on my scale went 2 notches to the right side! OMG!!  Also, my Aunt Flow gave me an unexpected visit 4 days earlier this month.  And the flow was very heavy. But by the second day, my weight dropped 2kg, back to where I was pre-period at 44kg, phew! 🙂   I can’t stop admiring my side view now, with a flat belly again. Now I can fish out my skimpiest bikini to flaunt 😉

    Did you know that your monthly visitor affects the number on your scale?

    omg-scale

    Don’t worry—if your shocking weigh-in lands the week before your period, you can chalk it up to water weight.  Weight gain happens five days before your period, but you’ll be back to normal once you start.

    Pre-period water weight can range from half of a pound to 10 pounds, usually averaging around five for most women.  That’s because the hormone progesterone—essential in the early stages of pregnancy—is to blame: when there’s no baby (aka when you get your period), these levels fall. As a side effect, each cell in your body retains an extra microscopic drop of water.

    While it doesn’t lead to weight change, bloating caused by gas can magnify the situation by making you feel a size bigger.

    You can combat these side effects the way you battle all bulge: with exercise. And drink a lot of water to help get rid of water retention. Also try and avoid fatty foods, alcohol and salt, which triggers your body to hold onto water.

    Women who say they feel stressed early in their menstrual cycle are more likely to report the cramping, bloating and mood swings of PMS  later in the month, a new study shows. If you happen to be one of them, try to stave off stress from your life.  Take steps to banish stress from your life and if all these fail, get professional help.

    If you suffer from weight gain and water retention before your period and wonder why this is happening, know you know the reason. After the heavy rain, you’ll see the rainbow.  Keep your chin up for your best days are ahead of you.  Most women usually feel at their peak in the first 7-10 days after their period.  I don’t know about you but I feel my best towards the end of my period before the whole cycle repeats again with mid-cycle bloatedness and ovulation pain followed by PMS pains.  Sigh, the pains of being a woman!

     

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About Me

I am a WFHM with 3 beautiful girls - Alycia, Sherilyn and Cassandra. I quit the job that I love to stay home with my 3 angels as that's what I've always wanted to do. I am a health freak, fitness freak and a clean freak too. I love to eat and live healthily and I want my kids and hubby to do the same too. Apart from being obsessed with good health, I am obsessed with fashion! I own an online store that sells ladies and kids clothing. Check out my online store at Old & New Stuff For Sale

I always believe that your health is your wealth and if you have good health, that's the best gift you can ever ask for from God.

Do check out my other blogs Health Freak Mommy and Health Freak Mommy’s Journal too!

I have been writing product reviews, food reviews / restaurant reviews and product advertorials since 2007. Please email Shireen at shireenyong@gmail.com to inquire if you are interested to place an advertorial or review in this blog.

Thank you!

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