How Many Eggs Can We Eat?

I have always loved eggs. Eggs are inexpensive, contain the highest-quality protein on the planet and are loaded with small amounts of vital nutrients, including folate, riboflavin, selenium, B12, and choline. At 75 calories a piece, eggs are also a nutrient-dense food that makes a smart and low-calorie contribution to any menu.

I try to include an egg a day into my kids’ diet. For me, I have been eating an egg a day since aeons ago. A friend of mine who is trying very hard to conceive has been advised by her fertility specialist to consume up to 5 eggs a day!  I have always wondered if there is a limit to the number of eggs that we eat and whether eating too many eggs will have negative effects on our health, especially on our cholesterol level.  I did a google search and the information that I have gathered is EGG-citing :

New research shows that, contrary to previous belief, moderate consumption of eggs does not have a negative impact on cholesterol. In fact, recent studies have shown that regular consumption of two eggs per day does not affect a person’s lipid profile and may, in fact, improve it. Research suggests that it is saturated fat that raises cholesterol rather than dietary cholesterol.

1. Eggs are great for the eyes. According to one study, an egg a day may prevent macular degeneraton due to the carotenoid content, specifically lutein and zeaxanthin. Both nutrients are more readily available to our bodies from eggs than from other sources.

2. In another study, researchers found that people who eat eggs every day lower their risk of developing cataracts, also because of the lutein and zeaxanthin in eggs.

3. One egg contains 6 grams of high-quality protein and all 9 essential amino acids.

4. According to a study by the Harvard School of Public Health, there is no significant link between egg consumption and heart disease. In fact, according to one study, regular consumption of eggs may help prevent blood clots, stroke, and heart attacks.

5. They are a good source of choline. One egg yolk has about 300 micrograms of choline. Choline is an important nutrient that helps regulate the brain, nervous system, and cardiovascular system.

6. They contain the right kind of fat. One egg contains just 5 grams of fat and only 1.5 grams of that is saturated fat.

7. Eggs are one of the only foods that contain naturally occurring vitamin D.

8. Eggs may prevent breast cancer. In one study, women who consumed at least 6 eggs per week lowered their risk of breast cancer by 44%.

9. Eggs promote healthy hair and nails because of their high sulphur content and wide array of vitamins and minerals. Many people find their hair growing faster after adding eggs to their diet, especially if they were previously deficient in foods containing sulphur or B12.

Thanks to more recent research, we now know the cholesterol in food has little effect on our blood cholesterol levels. What really affects blood cholesterol is the amount of saturated fat we eat. This means if you need to lower your cholesterol, the most important thing you can do is cut down on the amount of foods you eat that contain saturates, such as fatty meats, full-fat milk, butter, lard, cream, pastry, cakes and biscuits. Eating more fruit, vegetables and foods such as oats and pulses, which contain a type of fibre called soluble fibre can also help to lower cholesterol.

Thanks to this new found knowledge, the Food Standards Agency doesn’t recommend limiting the number of eggs you eat, unless your GP or a dietitian has specifically advised you to do this. This is great news for slimmers as eggs contain just 85 calories each but are packed with nutrients including protein, zinc, iron, iodine and vitamins A, D, E and some B vitamins (see chart below).

See, eggs are such a wonderful food that are bursting with nutrients. Forget about your expensive high-protein drink mix, just pop an egg a day and cook it any how you want it  – poach, steamed, hard-boiled, half-boiled, omelette, scrambled, fried, you name it. But go easy on the oil and butter.

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6 Responses

  1. Su Yin says:

    I have a 9 month old baby whom I just introduced egg yesterday morning but then in the evening his body broke out in little red spots.. i wonder if its egg related or its just coincidence. Is 9 months too early to intro egg or should I wait till 1 years? How old were your kids when you first introduced eggs?

  2. rachel says:

    I realized Philip likes egg too.. He can even eat up to 2 to 3 eggs a day..all cook and done differently. Sometimes I wonder is it ok… cos if he has a lot of egg today, then tomorrow no egg for him

  3. Paik Ling says:

    I always follow the “golden mean” rule – everything in moderation. You can’t go wrong with that.

  4. Chris says:

    I have an egg and a chunk of cheese for breakfast every day! U are right..eggs are a cheap and healthy food. There was the adverse publicity in the 70s abt cholesterol and eggs, but ppl know better now.

  5. sheohyan says:

    Myself and my family are also egg lover.

  6. shireen says:

    Su Yin… by right, you shd only feed your baby with eggs after he turns one. I started feeding Baby C with egg yolks when she was about to turn 12 mths old.

    Eggs are one of the top 8 of all allergens. It is the white of the egg that is allergenic and not the yolk. Many pediatricians will say that egg yolks are typically fine to be introduced to baby around 8 months old. It is very rare for anyone to be allergic to the yolk of an egg.

    The egg whites on the other hand, contain 4 proteins that can range from mildly to highly allergenic. Most pediatricians say that egg whites/whole eggs should not be fed to baby before 1 year of age.

    As always, you should consult your pediatrician about specific feeding habits for your infant.

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