A health freak mom's thoughts on health and all things healthy

Month: September 2013

What The?

What The?

While waiting for Alycia to have her hair cut at a hair salon today, I saw a lady seated next to me having a hair rebonding done.  On the table in front of her was a plate of bite-size snacks, a cup of tea and […]

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Cat beds

Cat beds

Many years ago, the SIL had a very beautiful Persian cat with greyish whitish fluffy soft fur. The cat required pretty high maintenance from food to grooming and vaccinations. It slept in a cage and on some days, it would be allowed to roam in […]

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Agave Nectar

Agave Nectar

In our household, white sugar is not used.  White sugar has gained such bad reputation in recent years that more people are aware of its negativeness now. Recent studies and articles have suggested that white sugar feeds cancer cells and too much white sugar causes cancer.  In our household, we only use organic raw brown sugar (very scarcely used in cooking and always reduced in baking) and lately, I am starting to use Agave Nectar.

Being a PCOS sufferer since 2001, I have since cut down on white sugar and white flour products. PCOS sufferers have a disorder with insulin, a hormone that controls the change of sugar, starches and other food into energy for the body to use or store. Many women with PCOS have too much insulin in their bodies because they have problems using it. Excess insulin appears to increase production of androgen. High androgen levels can lead to acne, excessive hair growth, weight gain and infertility. I suffered from all these symptoms (except for excessive hair growth) at the height of my battle with PCOS 12 years ago.

I use Agave Nectar in many of my meat dishes. I also use it as a bread spread. Agave Nectar’s combination with butter on toast is delightfully yummy!  I find that the taste of Agave is somewhat similar to maple syrup and maltose.

agave-nectar.jpg

One of the most health-promoting properties of agave nectar is its favorable glycemic profile. Its sweetness comes primarily from a complex form of fructose called inulin. Fructose is the sugar that occurs naturally in fruits and vegetables. The carbohydrate in agave nectar has a low glycemic index, which provides sweetness without the unpleasant “sugar rush” and unhealthful blood sugar spike caused by many other sugars. Agave nectar is a delicious natural sweetener that can be used moderately – by dieters, some diabetics, and health conscious cooks – to replace high-glycemic and refined sugars.

Modern medical study has confirmed agave’s remedial properties. Agave nectar applied to the skin has been found effective against pyogenic (pus producing) bacteria such as Staph aureus. The tradition of adding salt to the nectar has been found to further boost its anti-microbial property. Agave nectar has also been proven effective against enteric (intestinal) bacteria.

Blue Agave (Agave tequilana)

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Apricot Pits

Apricot Pits

The other day, I bought a box of apricot pits / kennels from the supermarket. Thinking that the apricot pits would taste just as good as almonds, I was in for a major disappointment as the pits were bitter. There was no way I was […]

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Purple Antioxidant-Packed Soup For The Soul

Purple Antioxidant-Packed Soup For The Soul

Nursing a bad strep throat, I cooked a big pot of ‘purple soup’ today.   My ‘purple soup’ consists of 1 huge beet root, half a head of organic purple cabbage, 6 carrots, a big chunk of lean pork and several chicken feet. My kids […]

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Eating Fish Skin : Healthy Or Hazardous?

Eating Fish Skin : Healthy Or Hazardous?

This is probably a controversial issue. I used to love eating deep fried super crispy salmon skin. That’s until I read that salmon, and all big fish from deep seas are probably tainted with mercury. I discourage my kids from eating fish skin but sometimes I get lambasted for doing so! Oh well, it’s better to be safe than sorry. The big C is just too scary for me to deal with.

Food For Thought:
Both the skin and fat of fish collect toxins that accumulate in the waters of rivers, streams and oceans. These contaminants can also be found in the flesh of fish but not always at levels as concentrated as they are in the skin and fat. For that reason, eating the skin of the fish is not considered healthy. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) advises consumers to remove the skin, fat and internal organs before cooking fish that they’ve caught in the wild. (If you buy a whole fish at a market, it generally comes scaled and gutted.) However, the EPA warns that mercury is found throughout the tissue of fish, so removing the skin and fat won’t help you avoid that problem.

Mercury and PFOS cannot be removed through cooking or cleaning — they get into the flesh of the fish. However, you can reduce the amount of other contaminants like PCBs by removing fat when you clean and cook fish.

Food Safety Tips On Eating Fish From The Minnesota Department of Health:

Remove the skin, cut away the fat along the back, trim off the belly fat, cut away the fatty area along the side of the fish.

Remember the following tips when eating fish:

1. Eat smaller fish.

2. Eat more panfish (sunfish, crappies) and fewer predator fish (walleyes, northern pike, lake trout).

3. Trim skin and fat, especially belly fat. Also, eat fewer fatty fish such as carp, catfish, and lake trout. PCBs build up in fish fat.

What about you? Do you eat fish skin?

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Health Supplement Coupons

Health Supplement Coupons

Health supplements are a great way to keep your body working the way you want it to. The internet has made it much easier to get access to health supplements, which are generally only sold at specialized stores. However, the reasons to shop online are […]

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Chickpeas (Garbanzo beans) Health Benefits

Chickpeas (Garbanzo beans) Health Benefits

I boiled a big pot of chickpeas yesterday. I love chickpeas in all edible fashion — from boiled to toasted or fried, in humus, cooked in curries, dhals, in Indian snacks and much more. I also like chickpeas thrown into salads and this is just […]

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The Beautiful Side Of Ugly Crooked Teeth!

The Beautiful Side Of Ugly Crooked Teeth!

When I was a teenager, I used to hate my left upper snaggletooth. Some people call snaggletooth ‘vampire’s teeth’. In layman’s term, it is actually overlapping teeth. I hated the vampire’s tooth so much that at one point in time, I kept trying to pull the tooth off with my bare hand!

My perspective of the hideous vampire’s teeth went on a 360 degrees turn when I read from magazines that Japanese girls actually go under the knife to have a snaggletooth attached! There you go. Beauty is such a subjective thing. What you see as hideous can be wildly sexy and attractive to another! One man’s meat is another man’s poison.

In Japan, the snaggletooth procedure is called tsuke yaeba. Many think that yaeba make a woman look cute and youthful! Hmmm, this explains why I can still pass off as a teenager *wink* My hubs has two snaggleteeth. This also explains why he looks so youthful, though he is 42 this year!

Now, if you have a snaggletooth and really do think that it is making you look ugly, you can always have it removed by a good dentist, like the dentist montreal. Do not try to save by going to a dodgy dentist who charges you cheaply. When it comes to dental care, I only go to good ones, like those from the Centre Dentaire Montreal.

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