A health freak mom's thoughts on health and all things healthy

Month: December 2014

Badly Constipated By Traveler’s Constipation!

Badly Constipated By Traveler’s Constipation!

It’s been eight days since we arrived in Auckland and I think I had only pooped thrice! Yep, my worst traveling nightmare came true and this disorder has never once left me alone whenever I travel – near or far! I have taken everything that […]

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Lunch Today – 5 December 2014

Lunch Today – 5 December 2014

Cass is such an easy-going child.  She is not as persnickety when it comes to food, unlike her 2 older sisters.   She will even be happy if she is given just Honey Stars or bread for lunch or dinner!  But would I do that?  Only […]

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Runner’s Knee

Runner’s Knee

A few weeks ago, I had a sharp pain on my left knee cap each time I squatted down.   Sometimes there was a cracking sound and the knee felt cold and numb. The pain went on for about 10 days. The funny thing is that when I did my usual run in the morning, I did not feel the pain. The pain only came about each time I squatted down.   I was really upset and worried, fearing that I may be in a similar situation as the mil who has pain in her knees. I thought that my knee cartilage needed help or that I may have developed a mild osteoarthritis of the knee. I googled for an answer and found out that I had Runner’s Knee. So much for my love for running all my life, I have now succumbed to Runner’s Knee!

The hubs advised me to pop his Glucosamine tabs but I was reluctant. I eased the duration and intensity of my run each morning. Instead of running 5 rounds each morning, I brisk-walked 3 rounds and jogged 2 rounds at our condo jogging trek. I also spent some time doing knee exercises before I started running. On some mornings, I just did 4 rounds of brisk-walking and 1 round of running. After approximately 10 days, the pain was gone when I bent my knees! I was so relieved! Now that it is the school holidays, the timing is right for me to use the gym.  I now spend half an hour on the air-walker every morning.   Air-walking does not put so much pressure on the knees as running and jogging. I can also increase the duration of my exercise and sweat more when I work out on the air-walker.

What is Runner’s Knee
As the name suggests, runner’s knee is a common ailment among runners. But it can also strike any athlete who does activities that require a lot of knee bending — like walking, biking, and jumping. It usually causes aching pain around the kneecap.

Runner’s knee isn’t really a condition itself. It’s a loose term for several specific disorders with different causes. Runner’s knee can result from:

Overuse. Repeated bending of the knee can irritate the nerves of the kneecap. Overstretched tendons (tendons are the tissues that connect muscles to bones) may also cause the pain of runner’s knee.

Direct trauma to the knee, like a fall or blow.

Misalignment. If any of the bones are slightly out of their correct position — or misaligned — physical stress won’t be evenly distributed through your body. Certain parts of your body may bear too much weight. This can cause pain and damage to the joints. Sometimes, the kneecap itself is slightly out of position.

Problems with the feet. Runner’s knee can result from flat feet, also called fallen arches or overpronation. This is a condition in which the impact of a step causes the arches of your foot to collapse, stretching the muscles and tendons.
Weak thigh muscles.

Symptoms of runner’s knee are:
Pain behind or around the kneecap, especially where the thighbone and the kneecap meet.

Pain when you bend the knee — when walking, squatting, kneeling, running, or even sitting.

Pain that’s worse when walking downstairs or downhill.

Swelling.

Popping or grinding sensations in the knee.

 

What’s the Treatment for Runner’s Knee?
Regardless of the cause, the good news is that minor to moderate cases of runner’s knee should heal on their own given time. To speed the healing you can:

Rest the knee. As much as possible, try to avoid putting weight on your knee.

Ice your knee to reduce pain and swelling. Do it for 20-30 minutes every 3-4 hours for 2-3 days, or until the pain is gone.

Compress your knee. Use an elastic bandage, straps, or sleeves to give your knee extra support.

Elevate your knee on a pillow when you’re sitting or lying down.

Take anti-inflammatory painkillers. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), like Advil, Aleve, or Motrin, will help with pain and swelling. However, these drugs can have side effects, like an increased risk of bleeding and ulcers. They should be used only occasionally, unless your doctor specifically says otherwise.

Practice stretching and strengthening exercises if your doctor recommends them.

Get arch supports for your shoes. These orthotics — which can be custom-made or bought off the shelf — may help with flat feet.

 

 

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